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Full text of "Open Letter to the Lt. Governor of British Columbia - Station Point Grey"

9 June, 2013 

Open Letter to the Lt. Governor of British Columbia 
Government House, 
Victoria, BC 

Your Excellency, 

As her Majesty's Representative I respectfully and publicly petition the Crown to perhaps 
stay the appointment of the MLA for North Vancouver-Lonsdale, Ms. N. Yamamoto, to a 
new Cabinet position until a matter of significance has been dealt with in a proper and 
judicious manner. 

I am a former naval officer who has and continues to dutifully serve the Crown and who 
knows a thing or two about International Law, and about both the public and the cloak- 
and-dagger history of contemporary times. 

In this light, last year the University of British Columbia made an erroneous decision, 
under the insistence of the then Minister for Universities Ms. Yamamoto, to grant 
honorary degrees to 76 former students of Japanese-heritage, as well as David Suzuki, for 
the erroneous appearance of an injustice on being asked to leave the University of British 
Columbia subsequent to the Declaration of War by Canada against the Emperor of Japan 
and the Imperial Japanese Armed Forces in December, 1941. 

Under Japanese Racial and Citizenship Laws, many, if not most of these 76 students were 
considered citizens of Japan, a nation then at war with Canada. In 2012, the then 
Minister of Universities and the University appears to have been suppressed this fact. 

Prior to the granting of the 2012 honorary degrees I asked the University of British 
Columbia to read into the public record the diplomatic notes passed between the 
Parliament of Canada and the Government of Imperial Japan regarding the legal 



obligations to protect the non-combatants, as outlined in the Hague and Geneva 
Conventions and the Articles of War. 

This request appears to have been suppressed by the then Minister of Universities and the 
University. This request related to the mistreatment of non-combatants from Canada and 
those of our allies, by Japan during the war. The Empire of Japan, under a decision taken 
by and publicly announced through Rescript by its Emperor, refused to abide by the 
terms of International Law. 

Prior to the granting of the 2012 honorary degrees I asked the University of British 
Columbia to read into the public record the findings of the International Military Tribunal 
for the Far East (the Tokyo Tribunal) regarding the Crimes Against Humanity and War 
Crimes that the Emperor of Japan and the Imperial Japanese Armed Forces undertook. 

This request appears to have been suppressed by the then Minister of Universities and the 
University itself. This related to the deliberate and calculated murder of many millions of 
non-combatants during the war in the Pacific, what historians call the Asian Holocaust. 

Subsequent to the awarding of these honorary degrees I asked for the minutes of the 
selection committee and its attendance to be made public. This request appears to have 
been suppressed by the then Minister of Universities and the University. 

Subsequent to the granting of the honorary degrees I wrote a series of three articles titled 
"Station Point Grey and Very Special Intelligence" which outlined the real reasons 
why the students of Japanese Heritage were asked to vacate UBC. These essays are 
available at archive, org. This decision to make secure the Port of Vancouver and Station 
Point Grey was a matter of national security that related to both the Port of Vancouver 
and a radio intercept station, Station Point Grey, that was doing very special intelligence 
duty for the allies. 



In preparing these essays, I was assisted by historians at Bletchley Park, the Foreign and 
Commonwealth Office in London, and by historians at the Puzzle Palace in Maryland, 
who have access to the wartime records of Arlington Hall, as well as credible Canadian 
sources outlining the special Denniston-Little Accord of 1942 that tasked Station Point 
Grey. 

Much of the information in these essays was made known privately to the University and 
therefore to the Minister prior to the granting of the honorary degrees. This information 
appears to have been suppressed by the then Minister of Universities and the University. 

The letter, by which these 2012 honorary degrees were requested by a Non Governmental 
Organization, is of a tone and proclivity that a good lawyer could arguer that the letter is 
factious and demeaning towards a generation of Canadians who sacrificed so much to the 
common good. 

The question of whether the then Minister of Universities was aware of or participated in 
the drafting of this letter is a matter of solemn public concern. 

I will shortly be publishing a fourth article of the Station Point Grey and Very Special 
Intelligence Series. As an officer and a gentleman diplomat, as a scholar and as a Loyal 
Subject of the Crown I will be recommending to the Crown that the denial of the Asian 
Holocaust be considered a Crime in Canada on equal terms with the denial of the 
European Holocaust. 

Perhaps the Crown can also inquire as to whether prominent Canadians of Japanese- 
heritage like Ms. Yamamoto and Mr. Suzuki have lived too long with divided loyalties 
and whether those divided loyalties have prevented them from finding the courage and 
the character to step forward and speak to the truth about the Asian Holocaust. 

I need hardly to remind your Excellency that members of both the Suzuki and Yamamoto 
clans were willing participants to the Military-Industrial efforts of wartime Japan and that 



as a matter of national policy, the Government of Japan over the past seven decades has 
tried to influence how the rest of the world views both the Nation of Japan, and its 
perceived destiny in the world and its national history. 

It was the very reason of divided loyalties that posed the gravest concern to the security 
of UBC and the Port if Vancouver in the period 1941 to 1945, and is the very reason why 
UBC needed to be made secure. The former Minister for Universities, and her friend 
David Suzuki, thorough their actions, once again raises the question of divided loyalties. 

A Minister of the Crown has a special responsibility towards the truth and their service to 
the People of Canada. I proffer the opinion that the MLA for Lonsdale has neither lived 
up to the letter nor the spirit of her oath as Minister to the Crown and respectfully 
recommend that she be asked to sit on the back benches in the BC Legislature while this 
very legal matter is dealt with by the Crown with the seriousness that it is due. 

I would also proffer the view that should the MLA for Lonsdale refuse to sit as a back 
bencher or lend her cooperation to the Crown's efforts that she be asked by the Crown to 
resign her seat in the House and be encouraged never again to seek election to the House. 

With regards to the recent cabinet announcement, I would recommend to the Crown that 
should the incumbent Premier who presently is without a seat in the House stand in the 
way of allowing the Crown to act on this serious matter, that the Kelowna by-election be 
stayed for an indefinite period, and the privileges allowed her as a MLA be set to sit for a 
period of time of your determination. 

The aged and in many cases late gentleman who served in the Pacific and sacrificed so 
much for the common good during the Second World War cannot speak on this matter. 
In my younger years I had the honour to serve beside some of these kind and virtuous 
gentleman. I must keep the faith for those who serve and stand to speak on their behalf 

I stand a Loyal Subject of the Crown and Friend to Canada's Parliament, 



and respectfully yours 



Patrick Bruskiewich 
M.Sc.,B-Sc.,B.Ed. 
Former Naval Person